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I recently came across an old blog post from 2013 about the Little Free Library movement that has taken off in neighborhoods across the world.

In the Tom Hanks + Meg Ryan blockbuster “You’ve Got Mail,” a giant book superstore opens up right next to a small, independent bookstore. The movie explores how the two businesses are different. The giant store offers a wider selection. The small store provides a more personal touch. The giant store does a decent job at many things; the small store does an excellent job at a few things.

I’m in book club with a group of friends. When the book club began, everyone was eager to read again. “I haven’t read an actual book in so long!” many of the members confessed. So we got together and had rich discussions about wonderful books… for a few months. Then we started discussing TED Talks. Now we mostly just get together and chat. I’ve done a little investigating and have come to realize that this trajectory is strikingly common among book clubs. Why don’t we read books anymore?

This week, young readers from coast to coast will unite in celebrating the longest-running literacy initiative in the nation: Children’s Book Week. For the first time ever, official events are being held in all 50 states! In addition, classrooms, libraries, and booksellers across the nation will commemorate this important literary holiday with readings and activities.

You’re browsing the shelves of your favorite bookstore. Book spines of various sizes and colors flank a book whose cover is facing outward, looking you squarely in the eye. Not surprisingly, this is the book that interests you. Someone has clearly decided it’s special. Which...

Have you read all the books on your classroom bookshelf? If so, we’re impressed! Many busy teachers don’t have time to vet every single book available for independent reading time. Instead, you may rely on recommendations from other teachers, online reviews, or your knowledge of certain authors and publishers. Some of your most valuable book reviews, however, could come from your students themselves.

“O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” Ask your students what this famous Shakespeare line means, and many will tell you Juliet is wondering where Romeo is. As you probably know, she’s not. She’s wondering why he is. The confusion about this quote is not surprising. Wherefore in the world does wherefore mean why? It’s just one of the many puzzling nuances of the English language.

Founded by Todd Bol and Rich Brooks in Hudson, WI, Little Free Library is a nonprofit movement dedicated to offering free books in communities around the world. The idea is simple: set up small boxes in accessible locations, stock them with books, and encourage the community to “Take a Book, Leave a Book.”

Today’s guest post features the writing of Maria Hughes. Maria is a blogger, a parent, and someone who is very involved in the world of children’s books and child literacy. In this post, she sheds light on seven famous individuals who had dyslexia.

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