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If you’re on Facebook, you’re all too familiar with the high that comes from receiving a “like” on one of your posts. Researchers have suggested that this quick hit of dopamine in our brains can be as addicting as the most powerful drugs. We aren’t addicted to likes (or drugs!) here at Read Naturally, thank goodness. But we do know that likes are a good way to measure the appeal of a post. We use this data to figure out how to give our Facebook followers more of the content they want and less of the content they don’t.

To celebrate Read Live's fourth birthday, we solicited the help of Read Live’s best friends—a.k.a., our tech support staff. We asked them to tell about the growth and personality they’ve observed in Read Live over the years. Here are some fun facts:

In an effort to give you more of the content you want moving forward, we decided to take a look back. We wanted to know which blog posts resonated most with our customers this year. Here are the ten most popular posts from the past year:

Most fluent readers don’t question the seemingly unnecessary b in doubt. They know it’s there, and they know how to read and spell the word. But in the interest of expanding students’ vocabularies and developing their spelling skills, it can be beneficial to teach that the b actually does serve a purpose.

Have you read all the books on your classroom bookshelf? If so, we’re impressed! Many busy teachers don’t have time to vet every single book available for independent reading time. Instead, you may rely on recommendations from other teachers, online reviews, or your knowledge of certain authors and publishers. Some of your most valuable book reviews, however, could come from your students themselves.

I am lucky to participate in Minnesota’s Early Childhood Family Education program with my two children. At the beginning of our weekly class, each parent shares a joy. The purpose of this ritual is to build a culture of gratitude, even on days when our job feels thankless. After recovering from the stomach bug, we’re thankful for health. When it’s brutally cold outside, we’re thankful for a warm place to gather. Our kids keep us up all night, but we’re thankful for their smiles.

“O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” Ask your students what this famous Shakespeare line means, and many will tell you Juliet is wondering where Romeo is. As you probably know, she’s not. She’s wondering why he is. The confusion about this quote is not surprising. Wherefore in the world does wherefore mean why? It’s just one of the many puzzling nuances of the English language.

Founded by Todd Bol and Rich Brooks in Hudson, WI, Little Free Library is a nonprofit movement dedicated to offering free books in communities around the world. The idea is simple: set up small boxes in accessible locations, stock them with books, and encourage the community to “Take a Book, Leave a Book.”

Today’s guest post features the writing of Maria Hughes. Maria is a blogger, a parent, and someone who is very involved in the world of children’s books and child literacy. In this post, she sheds light on seven famous individuals who had dyslexia.

Make Your Student a STAR!

Read Naturally Star of the Month​Share your student’s success story—nominate him or her for our Star of the Month award. Win a Barnes & Noble gift card for the student and a Read Naturally gift certificate for your class!

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