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Read Naturally Strategy Programs

Understanding Read Naturally Strategy Programs

  1. Do the Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore stories align with the Common Core State Standards?
  2. What is the benefit of having students work in Read Naturally individually?
  3. How often should struggling readers use Read Naturally?
  4. Why are the stories read slowly? I thought one of the goals of the strategy is to improve students’ reading fluency.
  5. How does Read Naturally level the stories?
  6. Do the Read Naturally reading levels correspond to grade levels?
  7. Why are all of the stories nonfiction?
  8. How do your stories line up with lists such as Fry's most frequent words list?
  9. What student-teacher ratio works best with Read Naturally Strategy programs?
  10. How does the Read Naturally standard for accuracy in the hot timing prepare students for the DIBELS Next expectations for accuracy on oral reading fluency (ORF) assessments?
  11. I have been asked to align Read Naturally with state standards. Does data show a transfer of skills from reading fluency to the state test and to classroom performance?

1. Do the Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore stories align with the Common Core State Standards?

Yes, the stories in Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore align well with the Common Core State Standards based on quantitative and qualitative measures and text/reader considerations. All Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore passages correlate to Common Core State Standards guidelines according to the Lexile® text measures. In addition, Read Naturally stories are grouped by level, and the levels are sequenced so that the text complexity gradually increases as the student moves to higher levels. The stories in the lower levels are shorter and easier to understand, the ideas are explicitly stated, and the vocabulary is familiar. At each successive level, the stories become longer and more complex. The ideas require more inference, and the vocabulary is more sophisticated. Use the link below to see the tables of the gradually increasing difficulty of the Read Naturally levels, as shown by the number of words in each level and the Lexile® text measures.

See also: Charts of the Quantitative Measures of Text Difficulty of Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore

2. What is the benefit of having students work in Read Naturally individually?

One of the greatest strengths of the Read Naturally Strategy is that it is individualized. Each student begins at an appropriate reading level and progresses at his or her own rate. This powerful benefit of working individually is exemplified as each student:

  • Works in material that is at an appropriate level — never too easy nor too difficult.
  • Works independently and therefore does not have to wait or continue practicing already mastered stories while less able students are still working to pass.
  • Takes as much time as needed to master a story and progresses through reading levels at his or her own pace.
  • Stays on task without the distractions that working with other students can sometimes cause.

3. How often should struggling readers use Read Naturally?

The more time students spend reading, the more they will improve. We recommend that students use Read Naturally a minimum of three times a week, although four or five times a week is even better. Ideally, each Read Naturally session should be at least 30 minutes long, but 45 minutes is preferable.

4. Why are the stories read slowly? I thought one of the goals of the strategy is to improve students’ reading fluency.

Due to the research Candyce Ihnot studied while developing the Read Naturally program, the Read Naturally stories are read slowly to provide students the opportunity to learn to read the words accurately and ultimately more fluently.

It is during the modeling step that the students make sound-symbol connections and actually learn the words in the story. If the stories were read at a normal speaking rate, students would not be able to read along with the recording and thus would not build word recognition and accuracy.

Once the students have learned to accurately read the words during the read along step, they build fluency by reading the passage many times during the practice step.

When Read Naturally passages were rerecorded in 2011, the third reading was done at an expressive rate. The passages are recorded at a pace at which developing readers are able to actually read along during the teacher modeling step. Christopher Skinner, a reading development researcher, has done two studies confirming the value of the slower modeling found in the Read Naturally recordings.

In 1993, Skinner, Adamson, et al. found that slower rates of modeled reading resulted in lower error rates when compared to baseline data (study published in the Journal of Learning Disabilities in 1993).

In a study published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis in 1997, Skinner, Cooper, and Cole found that the accuracy of students’ reading was better after slower modeled reading than after faster modeled reading. The slower rates of modeled reading in the study were between 44 and 66 words per minute. These reading rates are actually slower than the rates used on the Read Naturally recordings.

5. How does Read Naturally level the stories?

We used the following readability formulas to level our stories:

  • Fry and Spache readability formulas for levels 0.8 through 2.7.
  • Harris-Jacobson readability formulas for levels 3.0 through 5.0.
  • Dale Chall readability formulas for levels 5.6 and above.
  • Lexile® reader measures  for all levels of Read Naturally Live and Read Naturally Encore.

To give you a frame of reference for how these formulas apply to other writing, here is the readability of a few well-known works:

  • Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss falls at 1.4 according to the Spache readability formula, low first grade according to the Fry readability formula, and 30L according to Lexile measures.
  • An excerpt from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J. K. Rowling falls at 5.0 on the Harris-Jacobson readability formula and 880L according to Lexile measures.
  • The Miranda rights fall at 5.5 on the Harris-Jacobson and Dale-Chall readability formulas and 1020L according to Lexile measures.
  • The Gettysburg Address falls at 6.8 on the Dale-Chall readability formula and 1340L according to Lexile measures.
  • The second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence falls at 8.8 on the Dale-Chall readability formula and 1630L according to Lexile measures.

6. Do the Read Naturally reading levels correspond to grade levels?

Our levels do correspond to the grade levels they are named for in that the readability scores for the stories in each level fall within about 0.3 of the named grade level.

However, this does not mean that stories in our 2.0 grade level, for example, are appropriate for all early second graders. Rather, the 2.0 level is appropriate for students of any age who should be placed in reading material at an early second grade level.

It is important to use the placement procedure to place students in the Read Naturally program. Proper placement is essential to provide the students with the right balance of challenge and success. And keep in mind that, because of the audio support, students often work a half year above their instructional reading level.

7. Why are all of the stories nonfiction?

Repeated reading is best done with interesting, nonfiction material. The ideal length of stories for modeling and repeated reading is 100–400 words, which is also a good length for a nonfiction passage on a specific topic, such as an animal, place, or famous person. Most good fiction stories require more than 100–400 words.

Nonfiction stories also appeal to readers of all ages. Struggling readers are reading below grade level. You might have a third grader, a fifth grader, and an adult all reading the same second-grade level material. So, the stories must be interesting enough to appeal to many readers and not appear too young or immature, regardless of the level of vocabulary in the story.

Read Naturally stories present new information about unusual animals, people, inventions, etc., and as students do repeated readings, they increase their knowledge base and share it with parents, in class discussions, etc. It is motivating for students to share the interesting information they've learned from the topics.

Nonfiction can also encourage students who have not previously enjoyed reading to want to read more about a particular subject that interests them—so they not only enjoy learning to read but also begin to enjoy reading to learn.

8. How do your stories line up with lists such as Fry's most frequent words list?

Many teachers are familiar with Fry's list of the 1000 most frequently used words in the English language. Read Naturally passages are made up of a high percentage of these words. For example, 96 percent of the words that make up the stories in level 1.0 are on the 1000 most frequent words list.

At the same time, Read Naturally believes that it is important to continually challenge students. Therefore, as the Read Naturally levels get higher, so do the number of words that do not appear on Fry's most frequent words list. The highest Read Naturally levels are made up of around 87 to 89 percent of the words on the most frequent words list.

These numbers dip from the 96 percent correlation of the lower levels, but appropriately so. As students are able to read in the higher levels, they are generally more knowledgeable of most of the 1000 frequent words and need to learn language that is much richer and more powerful. We want to continue to increasingly challenge students to grow and to expand their vocabulary in these higher levels. Therefore, Read Naturally passages provide a good balance of the most frequent words and less frequent words for students to practice.

Also, keep in mind that because the Read Naturally stories are nonfiction, a number of the words that do not appear on Fry's list are the proper names of famous people and places.

9. What student-teacher ratio works best with Read Naturally Strategy programs?

Read Naturally Strategy programs are best implemented with a student-to-teacher ratio of six students per adult. The ratio for Read Live can be raised to eight students per adult, but six students is optimal. Not all of the adults need to be teachers. Teacher-trained educational assistants, parents, or other adult volunteers can help run a Read Naturally Strategy program.

If many students are placed in the Phonics series, a lower student-to-teacher ratio may be needed, because the word list requires extra time during the Pass step.

10. How does the Read Naturally standard for accuracy in the hot timing prepare students for the DIBELS Next expectations for accuracy on oral reading fluency (ORF) assessments?

In addition to benchmark rate goals (wcpm) for ORF, DIBELS Next specifies accuracy expectations for different grade levels at different times of the year in their technical report. Because Read Naturally interventions require a high standard of accuracy (no more than three errors at the pass step), students’ awareness of the importance of accuracy is raised. Read Naturally’s attention to accuracy prepares students to be mindful of accuracy on their oral reading fluency assessments as well. Read Naturally's standard of accuracy actually surpasses the DIBELS Next expectation for accuracy on oral reading fluency assessments.

11. I have been asked to align Read Naturally with state standards. Does data show a transfer of skills from reading fluency to the state test and to classroom performance?

It sounds like your school may be confusing apples and oranges. Read Naturally is not designed to be aligned with state standards any more than any other targeted intervention program is aligned to standards. Intervention programs are designed to address assessed needs of students who are scoring below and far below basic on the state assessments.

Much research has documented the critical relationship between fluency and general reading proficiency, including comprehension. You as a teacher do not need to prove this, since it is already clearly documented in the research literature.

When you look at state assessment results and determine that some students are not meeting state standards, then you must follow up to determine why. Curriculum-based measurements can help you determine whether fluency is one of their issues by comparing their fluency scores to national norms.

If you determine that students have a fluency deficit (they are in the 25th percentile or lower for their grade), then you must provide research-based intervention to improve their fluency, and Read Naturally is one of the best programs to accomplish this. It is research-based and validated to work quite well for students with assessed fluency needs.

Your fluency assessment will document whether Read Naturally is working for them.

However, note that most students will have other needs besides fluency, such as comprehension strategies, vocabulary, decoding, and writing. No one program is all things to all students.

— Kevin Feldman, Sonoma County Reading Director

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